Never say Republicans aren’t Very Serious about creating jobs…

… and looking out for the little guy. Because that had to be said.

“I’m on a quest to seek and destroy unnecessary burdens on the freedom and liberties of people. This is an example of Big Brother government. All that it does is prevent some dwarfs from getting jobs they would be happy to get. In this economy, or any economy, why would we want to prevent people from getting gainful employment?” Rep. Ritch Workman, a REPUBLICAN wants FLORIDA to reinstate dwarf tossing

It’s Florida, so. Duh. But how comatose or mentally ill do you have to be to actually vote for some guy named “Ritch” who thinks gainful employment is being born small enough to be tossed around by drunk adults? That right there is some 100% preemo, Teaparty American Exceptionalism.

Teabagger base, we are still not laughing ‘with’ you all.

 

PHOTOS: Teaparty vs. #OccupyWallStreet — WHY have the media taken one group more seriously?

Why?

Photo credits:

(Cartoon) Historical policy positions from corporations and Republicans on labor and jobs

image: abaldwin360

Real Populism vs. Corporate PR: #OccupyWallStreet vs. the Teaparty™

Excellent post on how true grassroots movements do not have wealthy and powerful sponsors like Fox “News” and corporations and the Koch brothers:

Real Populism vs. Corporate PR

There is one not so obvious or immediately noticeable difference between the Occupy Wall Street protests and your average Tea Party protest. Sure, the crowds seem to be younger, signs featuring Obama as Hitler are entirely absent, and there aren’t many people who are dressed like Uncle Sam sneezed stars and stripes all over them. There are no guns or demands to see the president’s birth certificate. But the less obvious difference is in buses. While the Tea Party protests always feature big buses covered with flags and eagles, buses at the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations are used to haul the protesters to jail.

I bring this up because teapartiers like to pretend they’re running their own show. That their protests are grassroots and their organizations are of their own construction. But those buses carting them around from protest to protest didn’t just appear out of nowhere. Someone paid for them, someone gave them their ultra-patriotic paint jobs, someone’s buying all the gas. All that takes funding and, as much as the ‘baggers like to pretend they’re an independent movement, they’re all bought and paid for— and then moved from square to square like pawns on a chessboard.

On the other hand, Greg Sargent has this to say about the Wall Street protests:

…If there’s one thing that’s growing clearer by the hour, it’s that this is an entirely organic effort, one that’s about nobody but the protestors themselves. In this sense, we’re seeing a replay of the Wisconsin protests. Those ended up falling just short of what activists had hoped to achieve, but their months-long showing was still important — it demonstrated that left wing populism is still alive and well and sent an important message about the mood of the country. The key was that it grew organically with little to no involvement from Beltway Dems and the White House.

If anything, Occupy Wall Street’s lack of outside encouragement from bigfoot Dems has been a strength, rather than a weakness. As major progressive groups debate how they can contribute to strengthening the movement — and how to give it specific direction and a specific agenda — the need to preserve its grassroots nature will remain paramount. Who knows where this will end up, but for now, this is another reminder that the Tea Party isn’t the only voice of popular discontentment over the economy. We don’t necessarily live in Tea Party Nation, after all.

Read the whole thing…

It’s also interesting how these protesters don’t feel the need to constantly reassure themselves and each other how ‘patriotic‘ they are. They just are.

Jon Stewart compares coverage of #OccupyWallStreet and the Teaparty

Jon sums up Fox News commentary about Occupy Wall Street protesters like this:

“This group is a laughable gang of disorganized, confused … Nazis. This is an ill-disciplined, highly-trained, weed-smoking, Fascist organization.”

And to Hannity’s comment to Ann Coulter about the Wall Street protesters: “And in the end, ultimately, they really want Statism over free market, so they really don’t like freedom,” Jon says:

“Oh… all right. So rage against duly elected government is patriotic, quintessentially American, whereas rage against multinational shareholder-accountable corporations is anti-American. Gotcha. Okay…”

 

Contagion and vaccines: “We’re one strong pandemic away from a breakdown of the social order…”

“You are at the mercy of viruses that are evolving far faster than we are, and our lives depend on the luck of our genetics, the random permutations of recombination in pathogens, a bit on our efforts in hygiene and social practices, and a great deal on science supplementing our immune systems. We’re one strong pandemic away from a breakdown of the social order, and we rely on science and vaccinations to help protect this tasty giant petri dish of human meat we call planet Earth.” — PZ Myers on the movie Contagion

Source: freethoughtblogs via: sciencecenter

#OccupyWallStreet BY THE NUMBERS: What’s actually “too big to fail” … 1% or 99%?

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka at the Take Back The American Dream summit:

Trumka said of Republicans, “If they want to have a debate on class warfare, we’ll have that debate,” because “It wasn’t our class that started the war on working Americans.”

Trumka used his time to illustrate many of the examples of what he termed the “strange morality” of the modern economy, from mass layoffs at Bank of America despite record profits to narratives in which “the jobless are blamed for the unemployment crisis.” He also noted that, “The years from 1997-2010 represented the first protracted decline in family income since the Great Depression.”

Yet, referring to the many debates in Washington this year, he asked “When are we going to recognize that this crisis is a jobs crisis, not a debt crisis?”

When it comes to the supercommitee charged with resolving said debt crisis, Trumka offered his take to great effect: “We’ll fight anyone from any party that tries to cut Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid benefits.”

[...] Trumka returned to the meat of his speech and his obvious rhetorical preferences: the economic crisis. “Americans want to work,” he intoned, “and we won’t stop fighting, shoving, pushing and kicking until every single one is back to work.”

And lest his opponents try to argue that “‘Government can’t create jobs,’” he promised his response would be, “‘Just you watch, we’ll make government create jobs.’”

To the Republican party and the 1% they represent:

Admitting you were wrong about #OccupyWallStreet, or reasons I love John Cole

“So yeah, I’m looking back at my snide post where I called the vanguard of this “trustafarians,” and once again, I feel like an idiot. This may still fizzle out without any real change, but right now, it seems to be building, and the reason it is is because a small group of people went out there and publicly voiced their displeasure with the shit I’ve been sitting on my fat ass writing dyspeptic posts about for the last year, but not really doing a god damned thing to enact change. Yeah, it was some jackasses with a drum circle, and no, they didn’t have a point by point plan or coherent media strategy like some anal retentive douchebags like me were demanding. But they went out there and did something, and it seems to be working. Let’s hope it keeps growing.” The More This Happens — John Cole admits he was wrong about #OccupyWallStreet

He’s always honest plus he’s a great dad to his two dogs and cat. And he cooks all the time. Marry me!