And now it’s snowing in Japan

Members of the Japan Self Defense force walk through the snow-covered  ruins of Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, days after the area was devastated  by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami March 16, 2011.
Members of the Japan Self Defense force walk through the snow-covered ruins of Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, days after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami March 16, 2011. (via producermatthew)

NPR / AFTERSHOCKS: There have been nine earthquakes of 5.0 magnitude or above today in the same region struck by last Friday’s massive, 9.0 temblor, the U.S. Geological Survey reports. The hardest quake today registered 6.0.

BBC 1507/ BEWARE THE IODINE PEDDLERS: The Associated Press reports that the nuclear scare is proving to be a sales bonanza for traders in iodine, face masks and radiation meters. This is particularly the case in Russia, where people have painful memories of the false securities given in the wake of the Chernobyl disaster. “It is a pity that certain businessmen are trying to profit on the situation,” Olga Shekhovtseva, an Emergencies Ministry spokeswoman in Russia’s Primorsky region, told AP.

BBC /1446 THE MISSING: The mayor of Ishinomaki, in the devastated Miyagi prefecture, has told Kyodo the number of missing in that town alone is likely to reach 10,000.

CNN / THE DISPLACED: [9:15 a.m. ET Wednesday, 10:15 p.m. in Tokyo] The governments in Iwate, Fukushima and Miyagi prefectures have asked the Japan Prefabricated Construction Suppliers & Manufacturers Association to build almost 33,000 homes to temporarily house those displaced by the quake and tsunami, Kyodo News service reports. At least 430,000 people are staying in shelters across eight prefectures, according to Kyodo.

CNN / THE RADIATION IN THE WATER: [6:48 a.m. ET Wednesday, 7:48 p.m. in Tokyo] Tests revealed traces of radiation in tap water in Fukushima city, 80 kilometers (50 miles) from the Daiichi nuclear plant, the local government said Wednesday. The Fukushima prefecture’s nuclear department said amounts of radioactive cesium and iodine that are not harmful to the human body were found in water samples taken at 8 a.m. Wednesday (7 p.m. ET Tuesday). Government officials said the traces found are connected with the nuclear plant. A measurement of the tap water supply taken later in the day found no traces of iodine or cesium.